Saturday, December 3rd, 2016

And they make nice rugs, too

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In honor of the prolific Polar Bear making the endangered species list, I thought a brief look at the bear and it’s proper relationship to mankind would be in order.

Important facts about Polar Bear meat:
Polar Bear Meat – General

Although polar bear meat is considered delicious it is never eaten
raw like other meats because it carries many parasites. The polar
bear liver is never eaten or fed to the dogs because it causes
Vitamin A poisoning, which results in severe illness or even death.
Polar bear meat, like most country foods, is an excellent source of
iron and protein. Polar bear fat provides Inuit with Vitamin A and
omega-3 fatty acids which helps reduce the risk of heart disease.
Polar bear meat is usually baked or boiled in a soup or stew.

Polar Bear and Nutrition

Polar bear meat is an excellent source of iron and protein. Polar
bear fat provides us with vitamin A and omega-3 fatty acids. These
fatty acids help to reduce the risk of heart disease. Polar bear
meat is usually baked or boiled in a soup or stew. It is never eaten
raw. Polar bear liver contains toxic levels of vitamin A and should
not be eaten.

Polar Bear Stew

4 pounds (1.8 kg) polar bear meat
Water to cover
3 tablespoons (45ml)salt
1 1/2 cups (360 ml) dried potato
1 cup (340 ml) celery flakes
1 tablespoon (15ml) dry union
2 cups (480 ml) dehydrated carrots
1/2 cup (120ml) melted butter
1 3/4 cups (420 ml) flour
1 teaspoon (5ml) garlic powder or garlic salt
3/4 teaspoon (3ml) pepper

Cut meat into bite-sized pieces and boil in salted water for 1 1/2 hours or more. Then add dry vegetables; mix melted butter with flour, blend in seasonings and add to meat. Cook 15 minutes longer. The stew is ready. Makes eight to ten servings
Cooking Alaskan by Alaskans
Norma Silook, Gambell, Saint Lawrence Island

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